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in europe -- but greece -- puts greece as the most corrupt country in europe. >> germany is mulling over whether to try to outlaw a far- right party accused of stirring up anti-immigrant sentiment. minister >> to go formal step toward banning the national democratic party, -- ministers took a formal step toward banning the national democratic party, the npd. some worry that prohibiting the party could backfire. it could drum up sympathy for the far right. >> the ministers are united in their call for a ban on meat npd. they reviewed extensive -- on the npd. they reviewed extensive documentation before making up their mind. >> i never would have thought they were so anti-democratic or anti-semitic. or so oriented towards violence and so unconstitutional. we have been discussing a ban for 12 years. now we have a lot of material to go on, much more than ever before. >> the ministers will seek to the government's support for the ban. one federal interior minister said they have a good case, but he admits there are risks. >> the danger is that these proceedings could give new life to a party
politics and compromise. everyone knew about the growth. just like in europe. means it could be, in fact, reduced dramatically. fewer jobs, larger deficit. not smaller. and the federal reserve that's throwing up its hands, can't do anything. as i said last night, it doesn't matter. we can pick our stocks and buy them down. like the fabulous names, amazon, ulta salons. buy them down in scales like i outline in the book "real money." now suggesting other groups giving you a bang for the buck. new groups betting that the hope will be squeezed out and the bottom gets put in before a deal is made -- or not. why not? we know the auto market is for 11 years now and we have been sweet on ford domestically. before sandy. where are we internationally? europe. what are some of the other key area, though? i think latin america, though. i think it's coming back. asia already turned. here's the new piece of data. i think europe could be stablized. ford is the one to watch. you get that thing at 11 or blow. i'm out blessing it. haven't done that in a while. in europe i'm thinking that i'm sanguine. exc
previously thought, although the session still looks very much on course for another quarter here for europe. the pmi will rise above 50 that divides growth between contraction. hasn't stopped the euro/dollar from hitting a one and a half month high. i suppose we know growth is going to be anemic, but if spanish banks are getting some money, are we feeling slightly better? >> that's what euro trades on, isn't it? pmis are all very interesting for the economist. but they want bigger stories. most of the news flow, it's helpful to the euro. people have been trying to affect this rally for a while. we are close to those october highs. the news flow has been good, i would say. >> we hit, what, nearly 131.80? >> before that, we go 131.40. the enthusiasm for euro is surprisingly good. we're surprised by how far this rally has gone on pretty thin news sometimes. >> i just want to recap what we've got. eurozone finance ministers meeting in brussels. an agreement still seems pretty elusive at this moment. germany and french finance ministers have very different views about oversight of banks. and in
been a resurgence of developed markets, europe particularly, and investors who left that market, that's been a great place to be for the last few months. there's so much focus on fiscal cliff. i think that's very hard to do on a day to day basis. for multiasset portfolios, the rest of the world is a good story right now. >> because we're so dominated by these issues in washington. rick santelli, some enthusiasm going on in these markets today with the anticipation of perhaps a deal. do you buy into it? is that what you're seeing in chicago? >> first of all, there are many expecting a deal. down in chicago, we don't just hope for a deal, we hope for a reform-oriented deal. to just do a deal without tagging it to reform is just going to make more of the same at some future date. the treasury complex really, really unfazed by just about all of it. briefly, we're under a 158 yield. haven't been there since second week in november. after 815, 118,000 jobs, interest rates were never as high as they were before that number. that really set part of the stage for treasuries. >> and you guys do
. the number of people planning to visit europe rose nearly 14%. the number of domestic travelers also increased by 1.3%. trips to the tokyo area are expected to rise nearly 2%. the capital's new landmark, tokyo's sky tree tower and the renovated tokyo station are expected to be tourist spots. >>> judges on the tokyo district court ruled the government must pay compensation for worker who is suffer health problems due to exposure to asbestos. the plaintiffs claim the workers inhaled asbestos at building sites causing them to develop lung cancer and other illnesses. the presiding judge said the government didn't do enough to protect workers for the risks posed by asbestos. he said it should have ordered contractors to ensure workers more dusk masks and impose a penalty for violations. the court ordered the government to pay $13 million in damages to 170 former workers for their bereaved families. in all more than 600 plaintiffs across joop japan have filed lawsuits against the government, claiming damages for asbestos. the japanese government outlawed asbestos in principle in 1975, but
that is necessarily the right body to do it. it certainly does not think that all 6000 banks in europe should be involved. france on the other hand -- france and spain leading the charge, saying that this must be done now. financial markets are being very good and not panicking, but if they see continued failure of eurozone finance ministers to agree to this, we might get the restoration of finance of duties, which of costa much trouble in recent years. the deadline for agreeing is no overarching bank advisory super body is meant to be in place on january 1. it does not look likely, and a lot of frustration at this meeting today with the sides deeply divided and no sign of agreement. that, of course, is the basic issue -- why has there not an overarching supervisory control? precisely because it was difficult to do then. the eurozone crisis highlighted that failure, and we've still got the same problems blighting the regular meetings of finance ministers. >> despite the eurozone crisis, german exports are still robust. >> we will have the latest on the german export data later on in the progr
. champagne sales are going flat in europe. so far this year, champagne shipments from popular french regions have dropped 5%. while many blame the euro crisis, cold weather and rain have damaged this year's crop of grapes needed to produce the festive beverage. however, while sales are down in europe, demand from the u.s. has remained steady. champagn sales are expected to bubble up for year-end celebrations. forbes is out with its annual list of overpaid actors. eddie murphy plays high this year, coming in at number one. according to forbes, the actor has had a string of flops following the blockbuster shrek movies. forbes estimates for every dollar murphy is paid, the return on average for his last 3 films is $2.30.katherine heigl logs second with a return of $3.40. reese witherspoon is third at $3.90. sandra bullock at 4th with $5, and jack black rounds out the list at $5.20. still to come, how friction in washington is chipping away at the economy. chuck coppola has a report. but first, places to park your money in 2013 is next, with bill moller. in the eyes of the world, the u.s. is po
idea what he was saying. turner traveled throughout britain and europe. often on foot, carrying a paintbox, he sketched and painted lyrically beautiful landscapes that changed the face of british art. when he died in 1851, he was one of the wealthiest and most famous artists in britain's history. throughout his career, he was always well aware of the key to his success. (reader) "the only secret i have got is damned hard work." (narrator) turner's life and career began in london. by 1788, at the age of 14, j.m.w. turner was apprenticed to an architect as a draftsman. architectural views appeared in his works throughout his life. the next year, turner entered the royal academy of arts school at somerset house. its president, the painter joshua reynolds, endorsed the prevailing view that ranked paintings in a clearly defined hierarchy. history painting was considered the noblest because it could portray events drawn from historical incidents, literature, the bible and mythology. genre painting, scenes from daily life, came next because they also offered examples of virtue to inspi
anyone else. central europe last year, budapest, the czech republic had gone from a leading country in central europe, leading the region in laws and in the constitution of equality 16 years ago to a complete reversal today. it's got one of the worst records today of the deprivation of rights of women, roma people, jews, and lgbt people. sound familiar, that grouping? i was not prepared for what i was going to find in budapest. i was not prepared for the thousands ofneo nazis and state sanctioned militia that would meet a couple hundred marchers, thousands of them. * there was one young man, 21 years old, young hungarian, who would be the only person to go on tv with me, only hungarian, malan would take a blow horn and walk through the streets against families that hated us, and he walked and he shouted and he kept the morale up as we were walking against this sea of people who didn't like us because we were representing the inclusion and diversity that we so much cherish here. he was inspired by the story of my uncle and he said to me, do you think this is how harvey felt? and i sa
by climate change? >> our economy is mainly based on tourism. incidently, mainly from europe. there have been changes in the patterns of the fish, so our whole economy is now at risk. if it continues like this, the seychelles, the sea level rise will not be our biggest problem but we will become a failed state. >> you are in the indian ocean. place yourself geographically with other islands off the coast of africa that you are near. >> we are in the group of 115 islands east of kenya, north of madagascar. we cover a huge area of the southwestern indian ocean. we're at the full mercy of what happens in the ocean. we are ocean people. anything that affects oceans, whether through increased temperatures, acidification, which is a bigger threat to khor reece that morning temperatures. >> what happened with acidification? why is that a result of climate change? >> we are reaching the limits of carbon dioxide and water can take out of the air. we have abused the oceans as we have abused the forests. >> people here have said they joked that they found something with a label made in the u.s.a., and t
parts of europe would become less risky. he basically made a goldman-sized bet at a firm that was only a sliver of goldman's size. >> the firm's stock is getting crushed yet again this morning, and mf's credit rating was cut to junk by moody's overnight. >> how can something like this be allowed to happen? how can n e individu completely shape the destiny of this firm and ultimately its demise? >> these two stories on this special ededion ontline. >> frontline is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major funding is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. and by reva and david logan, committed to investigative journalism as the guardian of the public interest. additional funding is provided by the park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. and by tfrontline journalism fund, supporting investigative reporting and enterprprprprprpp >> martin smith: it's one of america
-quality problem, turning around europe, taking india by storm, talking about adding thousands upon thousands of stores throughout china, even showed you numbers that said unlike yum, kentucky fried chicken, hasn't seen any deceleration in china. these are my ears like i listen, i've watched. howard schultz, call me crazy, investing with them, my bad. and then i heard the questions from the audience, i didn't even listen. what were they looking at versus what i was looking at. they were looking at john carter, i was looking at the new bond movie. one after another, they were all down beat. is the expansion too rapid? whether demand for expensive coffee is there. i was waiting for a guy to say, listen, that triple cappuccino it stinks. if i were howard, i would tell them to take a hike. they were too negative versus what the company's up to. opportunity. starbucks was actually down. one time -- i have the apple ipad, you know, thing i'm like, wow, it's under 50. i mean, wow. terrific opportunity. ipad, i mentioned it, surprised one didn't come down and hit me over the head and knock me out. ap
. didn't raise the maximum amount. that's where we stand. it's another cautious day under way in europe. back to you guys. >> might get my haircut like hers, ross. you know, that anna wintour. that bizarre -- do you think you can manage it? >> a page boy. >> you think you carry that one? >> you'd look awful. >> you know what? we're going to do it. >> you're asking these guys to put me -- >> you'd look good in that one from "dumb & dumber." >> yeah. i make that sound. the most annoying -- you want me to do that? >> no, we don't. >> morgan stanley is trying to bolster lending. some advisers are said to have left the firm due to a lack of lending capacity. you didn't bargain for this, did you? we're asking you about your company. is that okay? >> absolutely. >> greg funding -- we already know he joins us. you did provide investors with an update. >> yes. >> ross, you want to get into this conversation as well? you hear him? >> he's gone. >> he's gone now. our audio guy is drinking or something. what did you tell them? >> i told them that we have a great business in wealth management. we've
on fiscal negotiations look like to the rest of the world, particularly europe where eurozone are taking drastic budget cuts and austerity measures that make our situation look tame. chris just returned from a trip to europe's capitals, including athens, and shares his experience of the complete xlik devastation in greece currently dealing with. >> jared bernstein, former economic adviser. >> we don't know what the risks are of what might happen january 1st. there's a risk it could be horrible. that's all i'm saying. tell me what you saw in athens n greece when you were just there. >> i've traveled to greece quite a bit over the last few years for political work i've done there in the past. i don't know how to express it any more clearly than it was unbelievably sad and depressing. i mean, the country is in a great depression. unemployment is about 25%. unemployment among youths is about 55%. the economy contracted by 7.2% in the last quarter. those are numbers. i'll tell what you i saw which i think is more go through part o the greek beverly hills, if you will, and you see store closed
on "newsline." >>> finance ministers in europe have have been discussing the possibility of a central monetary union for months. they say they want the deals signed by the end of the year. joining us now from the business, you have been tracking the negotiations for us. tell us more about this. >> i know they have been trying to finalize the agreement within this year but they're still talking about it and with thousands and thousands of banks in the region it is understandable they have many detail to iron out. at the latest meeting the finance ministers failed to reach an agreement on the legal framework for unifying oversight of banks across the eurozone. opinions were divide the during the meeting in brus sells on tuesday and france called for an enter introduction of a unified oversight while germany urged a gradual implementation. ministers also couldn't agree on how much supervisory authority to give the european central bank. they decided to meet again next week for further discussions. eu, economic, and monthly tear affairs commissioner said consolidation of oversight will be the firs
that the united states had the highest economic and security interests in the asia pacific region. not in europe as has been for 100 years prior to that, than the asia pacific region. secondly, that we would maintain freedom of access throughout that region. in particular, we would maintain the sea lanes in that area, whatever the challenge might be. even as we reduce our defense budget, therefore we must maintain and would maintain a powerful navy, and that that navy would be charged with maintaining the freedom of those sea lanes. we had, of course, to be concerned as to whether there would be a challenge for that. we observed that the rise and shine has more energy needs for more energy than they can produce themselves, and to maintain the economic growth which they believe is essential. we observed that the south china sea is a potential source of energy supplies for china and that there is a contention among the nations in that region as to where the ownership and rights of access are to the south china sea. and this is conceivable that china might seek to reestablish its claim there by mil
. europe is going to be in the doldrums for quite some time. asia is not charging forward and some of the emerging markets are not charging forward as quickly as they were maybe a few years ago. but i think what all of you recognize and many of you have told me is that everybody is looking to america, because they understand that if we're able to put forward a long-term agenda for growth and prosperity that is broad based here in the united states, that confidence will not just increase here in the united states, it will increase globe balance leave. globally and i think we can get the kind of cycle that all of us have been waiting for and want to see. what is holding us back right now ironically is a lot of stuff that is going on in this town. and i know that many of you have come down here to try to see, is there a way that we can breakthrough the logjam and go ahead and get things done? and i'm here to tell you that nobody wants to get this done more than me. i know that you've got even a lot of briefings, let me just try to describe where the situation is right now with respect
in western europe have no interest in occupying and colonizing afghanistan into the 51st state, or whatever. the afghans are there tuesday. the others come and go. -- are there to stay. the others come and go. >> puc much fighting? gregg's my time was split between the capital -- >> my time was split between the south. endand the >> you know afghanistan well. thank you for coming in. it has been over a month now since a americans gave president obama four more years in the white house. there are now more minority voters than ever before. and in large part, the republican candidate lost because he failed to reach out to them. if your than one in three latino's failed to vote -- fewer than one in three latino's failed to vote for mitt romney. what will the republican party need to do to get the hispanic vote? >> at a christmas party outside of boston, republicans are not feeling particularly festive -- outside of austin, republicans are not filling a particularly festive. they know they have a challenge in front of them. within two years, hispanics will outnumber whites in texas. >> if you wa
are the afghans. the united states ended in western europe have no interest in occupying and colonizing afghanistan into the 51st state, or whatever. the afghans are there tuesday. the others come and go. -- are there to stay. the others come and go. >> puc much fighting? gregg's my time was split between the capital -- >> my time was split between the south. endand the >> you know afghanistan well. thank you for coming in. it has been over a month now since a americans gave president obama four more years in the white house. there are now more minority voters than ever before. and in large part, the republican candidate lost because he failed to reach out to them. if your than one in three latino's failed to vote -- fewer than one in three latino's failed to vote for mitt romney. what will the republican party need to do to get the hispanic vote? >> at a christmas party outside of boston, republicans are not feeling particularly festive -- outside of austin, republicans are not filling a particularly festive. they know they have a challenge in front of them. within two years, hispanics
with modest gains. europe holding onto gains and china up nearly 3% over night as shanghai catches a break. our road map begins with a $20 billion deal. freeport mcmoran getting into the energy business making two acquisitions. plains exploration and mcmoran exploration. >>> concerns over the u.s. economy as adp misses estimates. the blame goes to superstorm sandy. goldman says the party is officially over for gold. >> starbucks at an investors conference will add 1,500 stores in the u.s. over the next five years. wait until you hear what they said about china. >> a big day in media. pandora ceo joins us live later this morning as the stock fell nearly 20% on weak guidance and netflix signs a big exclusive with disney. how much are they having to pay up for that? >>> let's deal with this big deal. as i've been telling you we'll see a lot of big deals -- i was wrong. here we are. freeport mcmoran buying not one but two companies. the combined price if you add it all together gets close to $20 billion. that does include debt. let's go through some of the details. it's somewhat complex. let's
in europe, spain, portugal, yes, operationsy, italy. it measures the perception of the corruption in the public sector. as the most corrupt nations in the world. here we go. afghanistan, north korea, and somalia top the list. on the other side of the spectrum, countries with least perceived corruption, denmark, fin left-hand and new zealand. where does the u.s. rank? 19th. tracy: nobody lives in those countries. ashley: what they do is very simple and very clean. tracy: very blond. ashley: very blond. definitely in denmark and finland, that's for sure. tracy: the dark skin, the dark eyes. we're all evil at heart. ashley: that is the quote of the day. thanks, tracy. i didn't say that. tracy: all right. quarter after. come on. right? think about it. as we do every 15 minutes we check on the markets, nicole petallides on the floor of the new york stock exchange. from the most corrupt country in europe, good to have you with us. >> that is me. evil. i'm a little devil at heart. let's take a look at a big deal here. freeport-mcmoran, this is a $9 billion deal. these type of things brin
reach israel today and that will be able to reach europe in the not-too-distant future and ultimately the united states. second, you would have, i think, a nuclear tarmd iran would ignite a nuclear arms race in the most volatile part of the world, and third, you -- i think a nuclear armed iran would be significantly more aggressive in placing like iraq and afghanistan and throughout the region in terms of trying to throw their weight around. so i think that this is one of those situations where the only acceptable alternative, the only good alternative is that the economic pressures bring enough popular unhappiness in iran because of economic disasters that are going on there, that the regime decides it is in its own best interests and for its own security. >> rose: that assumes rational thinking on their part. >> i think that they are not irrational. and, you know, to say that they are rational actors all the time, i don't accept that either, but when it comes to these kind of things, the one thing they don't want is a war with the united states. and so i think that this -- the only
of the biggest unions larry. he said in western europe, they may have higher unemployment but they have less inequality. this is what the agenda is all about. in a practical way, suppose you have a successful person. he or she want to build a house. to do that you might hire 15, 20, 25 people. you got a whole army of people who would go to work. but if you get taxed, you might not guy that house. and you won't build. that is the kind of logic i'm not hearing. dow think they get that? >> they don't. i saw lincoln. remember during the debate in 2008 charlie gibson asked the then president obama why raise capital gains? he said it is about social justice and fairness. it doesn't matter that it doesn't work. what counts to these people is class and attacking this rich guy and this poor person who doesn't have much money. but the guy is on the margin of poverty. would love to go to work as a landscaper in this hypothetical home that i am describing. the guy on the margin, they would love to work like that. so, there is a connection there and i don't see why washington our friends on the democrati
for bad loans and more fee revenue get the credit. in europe, spain's finance minister warned the recession there has gotten worse. he described the current quarter's economy as the most difficult in the year since spain's recession began. the dow lost 14 points, the nasdaq down 5.5, and the s&p lost two. retail partnership-- target and >> susie: here's an unlikely retail partnership-- target and neiman marcus. in an effort to energize the early december lull in holiday shopping, the two stores are offering a unique line of designer housewares, gifts and clothing. the pieces are available at both target and neiman marcus stores and on their web sites. but, attention shoppers-- many of the hot items are going fast. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: four days after its debut, most of the much-hyped collaboration is still available at this target in edgewater, new jersey. there are gifts for your four- legged friends, and plenty of bar accessories for your partying pals, including shot glasses and cocktail shakers. there's even green transportation by alice and olivia. gone ith
are seeing in europe. many feel they have nowhere to turn. we must never let that happen here. and election has come and gone. the people have made their choice. policy-makers still have a duty to choose between ideas that work and those that do not. when one economic policy after another has failed our working families, it is no answer to expressed compassion for them or create government programs that offer promise but do not create reforms. we must come together to advance new strategies for the the people out of poverty. let's go with what works. looking around this room at the men and women who are carrying on jack kemp's legacy, i know we are answering the call. this cause is right. jack kemp started this. we know the good fight for the american ideal wood -- will go on until we reach all people. thank you for coming in here this evening. thank you for having us this night. congratulations to marco. [applause] >> now, this is 35 minutes. >> thank you. one of the highlights of the campaign for me is when i got to travel to meet paul's mom. >> thank you. i am really privileged to be her
across europe. he toured the world with his group, his music caught fire. he was only the second jazz musician after louis armstrong, to appear on the cover of "time" magazine. he was honored at the kennedy center, and got to watch his own sons perform music on stage. ♪ ♪ ♪ . dave brubeck, american master, was one day short of his 92nd birthday. >>> and jack brooks has died, had was a student of texas, an enemy of richard nixon, attacked government waste all his life. he was pro labor, pro guns and pro district funds. he was in the vehicle when president kennedy was killed in dallas, he was among the giants in congress, over 42 combative years in the house of representatives. jack brooks was eighty-nine years old. >>> and a prank phone call gets the attention in london and around the world this morning. two morning radio hosts had the bright idea to call the hospital treating the pregnant duchess. they asked to speak to her, and unlikely as it may seem they got through to her nurse. and you're about to hear, the call sounded like a bad monty python sketch, with them doing an act
this technology within the next decade. >> we are now working in europe and starting to get going in the middle east and asia. so there's absolutely no bounds to what this can do. >> reporter: arrowsight's technology is also widely used by the meat industry; in some cases, boosting productivity by more than 10%. the biggest barrier to adoption of the technology is not employee backlash, it's money. >> the most difficult thing about a new technology or new service is getting companies that didn't have this anywhere in their budget to create a budget line for it. >> reporter: but north shore hospital says its investment has more than paid off. >> it probably costs at least $40,000 to treat every serious m.r.s.a. infection. if we can eliminate just a handful of those in a year, we've easily paid for it. >> reporter: already, the hospital is planning to expand its video monitoring to other departments, including improving operating room safety and efficiency. erika miller, "n.b.r.," manhasset, new york. >> bob baur is the chief global economist at principle global investors, with $275 billion on ma
. that means some bank locations will be closed. the company saying that the companies and europe and asia are the ones that are most likely targeted. while citibank makes cuts, starbucks on the other hand is -- to expandtand next five years. me thousand add .tores across the globe 1500 of those will be here in the u.s. >> i cannot believe it. >> i know. you already have them across the street from each other. [laughter] it has been nice and above average. a cold front came through this warning. temperatures will drop tonight. go back into the 60's for the weekend. i have a great time lapse to share. this is frederick douglas elementary school in leesburg. watch as the cold front comes through. there is a very cool looking .ave cloud right there that kind of coincided the clearing with the sun setting. . gorgeous night winds diminishing around the area. 52 is the current temperature. a wind gust is 28 miles per hour. it feels like it is 48. temperatures in that 70's in the afternoon. 47 in germantown. all of this will come down tonight as high pressure continues to build in. temperatures d
released brand new images, the continents lit up, asia and australia, africa and europe, south america and north america. the united states, a beacon of light, right there across the galaxy. >>> and, our person tonight is dave brubeck, the man who put the urgent pulse into american jazz. he died at the age of 91, after a life of breaking through ray shall barriers and musical ones. before brubeck, this was the simple rhythm of most jazz songs. listen. ♪ but after brubeck, the famous five-four rhythm that rocked the world. here it is. ♪ dave brubeck. and we know there are people and videos that capture your imagination every day, so, tweet me your thoughts for the "instant index," @dianesawyer. >>> and, coming up right now, we have a test for you. is this the queen of england? >> my dear, thank you so much. >> or, is this the queen of england? >> thank you for inviting me. >> do you know which one is the imposter? stay tuned. made a commitment to the gulf. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are
for those worried about europe, spain, portugal, the u.s. and the fiscal cliff, what do you say? >> the easiest thing to do is to take advantage of fear. when people are fearful like the y2k example, it was obviously an easy process to make money from there on out. we will get through this. the fiscal cliff. liz: you have seen it all, good to see you. good luck. one of our favorites. dow jones industrials hold onto gains of 96 points. can we hold all the way? we have six more minutes to go before the closing buildings. so glad you are hanging out with us at fox business. and we can save you 10% on ground shipping over the ups store. look this isn't my first christmas. these deals all seem great at the time... but later... [ shirt ] merry christmas, everybody! not so much. ho ho ho! this isn't that kind of al. [ ma announcer ] break from the holiday stress. save on ground shipping at fedex office. he loves risk. t whher he's climbing everest, scuba divinghe great barrier reef with sharks, or jumping into the marke he goes with people he trusts, whicis why he trades with a company
%. europe and the loo 20's. money goes where is welcome, and money and jobs are falling to other countries. we will have to change our tax had to make it more as the double the business. lou: as always. good to talk with you. much more on the fiscal cliff, the negotiations that went to college. we will take that up with the "a-team" and throughout the broadcast tonight. arabs bring to winter of discootent. chemical weapons, iranian nukes, tens of thousands protesting ease of snow is dictated. is u.s. intervention next? carl oliver north joins us in moments. runaway spending, our national debt top $16 trillion. who is doing the math? my next guest says it is all worse than people no. former house ways and means committee chairman bill archer after the break. this family used capital one venture miles to come home for the holidays. that's double miles you can actuallyse... sadly, their brother's white christmas just got "blacked out." [ brother ] but it's the family party! really jingles your bes, doesn't it? my gifto you! the capital one venture card! for any flightany time! th's double mil
corporatios. canadas 15%. europe and te loo 20's. money goes where iswelcome, and money and jobs are falling to other countries. we will have to change our tax had to make it more as the double the business. lou: as always. goo talk wit ou. much more on the fiscal cliff, the negotiations that wt to college. we will take that up wit the "a-team" and throughout the broadcast tonight. arabs brg to winter of discootent. chemical wapons, iranian nukes, tensf thousands protesting ease of snow is dictated. is u.s. intervention next? carl oliver north joins us in moments. runaway spending, our natinal debt top $16 trillion. whis doing the math? my next gest says it is all rse than people no. former house ways and means committee chairman bill archer aftethe break. ligations, but obligatio. i need trethink the core omy portfolio. what i really need is slee introducing the ishares core, building blocks for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call-800-ishares for a prospectus which incdes investment objectives, risks, cha and expens
their defense tab. you can't do it -- there's nobody to bail out america the way germany's bailing out europe. >> john boehner was on the program the other night. he said hey, i wasn't consulted about this latest offer. i wish i was. this talk about republican conservatives, tea party members that were purged from certain committees because they had a criteria list if they didn't meet or match the leadership vote schedule. is that a message to the more conservative way of the republican party? >> i think so. he's absolutely right to be disturbed about it. it's not john boehner's job to make this math add up. it's not john boehner's job to find ways of funding a three and a half or four trillion dollar budget. it's insane. if the democrats want to have a three and a half, four trillion dollar federal budget, fine. they can be the party of that. there ought to be a party that represents an alternative and john boehner is saying no, we'll help you close that gap. who needs the republican party? >> you think there will be an internal squabble, a fight, maybe an attempt to cede him in the end? >>
to lead the way. china is slowing down. india is slowing down. europe is in a recession. south america is slowing down. we have an opportunity to lead out of this mess. i hope we take the lead. >> jennifer: everyone wants to prevent going over over the cliff you still will have a lot of issues on how best to lead the country forward. allen west will be gone but there will be tea partyers remain. how do you work with people who think compromise is a bad word? >> look, i was just earlier with the republican part of my district today and met with a lot of republican commissioners. the message i told them is what i told everybody. whether you're a republican, democrat, i have an open door. i want to hear your thoughts, your concerns and i want to be your voice in washington, d.c. i plan to represent 100% of this district and being a passionate voice for everybody. i hope i can sit down with everybody in d.c. and whether republican democrat, tea party or not. i want to hear their point of view. i imagine they'll disagree, but i hope this race in particular my defeat of allen west will send
will support the biggest port development in europe, and i pay tribute to my honorable friend for the campaigning she's undertaken to achieve this. we've already set our plans this autumn for a huge investment in rail, and my right honorable friend the transport secretary will set up plans in the new year plans to take high speed go to yorkshire. i can confirm a billion pound loan and a guarantee to -- [inaudible] and support a new development on a similar scale to to olympic park. we're confirming funding and reforms to assist the construction of up to 120,000 new homes and delivering on flood defend schemes in more cities. on top of broadband expansion for our countryside and larger cities, we're funding broadband in 123 smaller -- 12 smaller cities, cambridge, darby, oxford, portsmouth, york, newport, aberdeen, and derry, londonderry. in addition to a third of a billion pounds announced this autumn for british science, we are today announcing 600 million pounds more for the u.k. scientific research infrastructure, and since improving our education system is the best investm
and hire folks. obviously globally the economy is still soft. europe is going to be in the dulldrums for quite some time and i think what all of you recognize and many of you have told me is that everybody is looking to america. because they understand that if we're able to put forward a long-term agenda for growth and prosperity that's broad-based here in the united states, then confidence will not just increase here in the united states, it will increase globally and we can get the kind of virtuous cycle that we all want to see. what is holding us back right now, ironically, is a lot of stuff that's going on in this town and i know that many of you have come down here to try to see, is there a way that we can break through the log jam and go ahead and get things done. and i'm here to tell you that nobody wants to get this done more than me. i know that you've got a lot of briefings but let me just try to describe where the situation is right now with respect to our fiscal situation, both what the opportunities are but what also the challenges are. i campaigned over the last year on
in aid to egypt every year. now europe is calling on the u.s. to stop that. what do you think about that? what is our best move at this point? >> well, let's remember that those 1.6 more or less billion dollars that we've been sending to the egyptian government, to mubarak for last 30 years or so, were sent for egypt to protect the peace with israel. to make sure the suez canal is always open for international trade and maintain security and friendship with the united states. now that morsi and the muslim brotherhood and salafists allies have form ad government, if they win this round against civil society they're going to move egypt toward more extreme allies. eventually the allies of morsi, salafists who attacked us ends at benghazi will turn against us. to make sure the $1.6 billion any dollars sent to egypt will go to a government that remains our ally and protector of freedom and democracy in the country. melissa: how do we do that? is that possible? if we revoke the money are we making the situation even more hostile? like you said the suez canal is very important. morsi was there
out he had trouble with the french language. you know, in europe they speak all these languages. he couldn't do the french so well. anyway, albert einstein went through school and he did go all the way and got his ph.d. got his ph.d. in physics. and about this time, he had a hard time getting a job. his thinking was a little bit-- well, for one thing, he didn't have a high regard for many of the ideas at the time. you know, we always name the streets after military heroes, you know, and if someone really butchers millions of people, man, they put a big monument up for him, right? einstein thought that was kind of upside down. that we weren't choosing our heroes very properly. you know, he had kind of funny ideas. anyway, he wasn't too popular and had some trouble getting a job. but he did get a job with the help of his lady friend again. and he get on at the patent office, i guess, in switzerland, going over patents that were being submitted. and here's a guy with his ph.d. in physics and all that. anyway, he was interested also in light. he asked a teacher one time, "what would a l
the corporate results. >> i completely agree. i think there is plenty of liquidity. what they did in europe was take pressure off banks. now you are seeing distressed assets get repurchased by their rightful buyers. the systemic risk thing is not things. thing is the earning recession or earnings cliff. i agree if you named the number one risk factor for u.s. stocks going into the year, the revenue growth game is over and it is really of it to manufacture profits the way we have in the last couple years. >>> coming up, we stay all over what's driving the dow up almost 140 points. >>> and if you like the smell of pepperoni, this new perfume may be for you. so anyway, i've been to a lot of places. you know, i've helped alot of people save a lot of money. but today...( sfx: loud noise of metal object hitting the ground) things have been a little strange. (sfx: sound of piano smashing) roadrunner: meep meep. meep meep? (sfx: loud thud sound) awhat strange place. geico®. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. >>> welcome back. before we do "pops & drops," want
in europe, also known as the helsinki commission, which i cochair -- which senator cardin cochairs, during senate consideration of h.r. 6156. the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. mr. wicker: thank you, mr. president. and, again, i come to the floor today to support this bill. it has is very important two-fold purpose. it promotes normal trade relations with russia, and at the same time the legislation insists that the russian government adhere to the rule of law. it does so by putting consequences in place for those in russia who abusive human rights, basic human rights. granting pntr to russia is a big win for americans. if congress does not act, american workers, including millions employed by small businesses, stand to lose out to foreign competitors as russia opens its market as a new member of the world trade organization. many in my home state of mississippi and around the country deserve to benefit from increased trade that this new relationship would bring. more jobs and greater economic growth are our potential rewards here in the united states. last year, mississ
. the japanese markets, european countries, countries in europe which are precarious are in bigger trouble. the whole thing is going wacky, one guy is going to be standing in the middle of the storm, not grover norquist or some republican, but the president of the united states who has to weather the storm and point the finger across the aisle to someone nobody else in the world knows and says, speaker boehner, would you solve this problem? i'm not sure -- that's why i'm against you on this one. i think times have changed. >> economically the biggest risk is the sequestration. it's not the tax cuts going into effect. and -- >> you mean the millions of dollars -- >> the cuts that will be forced through in the next two years. that's a much bigger risk to the economy. >> therefore? >> therefore, if the president lets this thing -- look, the markets have already priced this in. >> i hear the opposite. i hear that they believe that grown-ups will do the job when they have to. they don't believe they're going to let us go over the cliff. >> i don't think the grown-ups believe they have to do the
period, those are just in europe. let's see if we can agree on a couple things. do you agree that when i was a kid or when you were a kid, there was 340 parts per million of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere? >> sure. it's rising. what's your point? >> so here's the point, is it's rising extraordinarily fast. that's the difference between the bad old days and now. >> carbon dioxide -- >> much faster than ever in history. >> let him finish, mark. let him finish. >> it's the rate that's of great concern more than the actual -- >> what do you put that rate down to, bill? >> it's human activity. you go back -- this is what i say all the time. you look at the ice and you find bubbles of trapped gas from 200 years ago, let alone 1,000 years ago. there's nobody running around with a hypodermic needle injecting bubbles of gas in ancient ice cores. that's the ancient atmosphere in there so you can determine the co composition quite accurately. >> what are the biggest factors, the man-made factors creating the acceleration of co2 in the atmosphere? >> the biggest thing is when i was 9 years old, th
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